A new art exhibition aims to amplify …

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MODERN WOMAN: A MODERN SCOPE OF MODERN ART. The Pablo Center’s new exhibit, “Modern Woman,” features works by Holli Jacobson, Karen Searle and Dr. Jenny Lau. (photos submitted)

Three local women use their art to show a unique perspective of the world, highlighting the importance of raising the voice of women in our modern world.

The virtual exhibition “Modern Art” went online at the Pablo Center on June 25 and features the work of Holli Jacobson, Karen Searle and Dr. Jenny Lau.

“The recognition of talent through the exhibition is a joy that few women in art history – until the last half of the last century – have had the experience of appreciating,” said Rose Dolan. -Neill, responsible for visual and literary arts at the Pablo Center. “Seeking to give a voice to women creators by specifically addressing women artists to seek to understand their point of view is important; they created the work, and their voice will be heard.

“Women often downplay the value of their work, despite the impact it has on themselves and on others. Our creative work is important, especially during difficult social and political times. “

– Holli Jacobson

local artist

Holli Jacobson, originally from Jim Falls, grew up close to nature. Her abstract paintings leave viewers wondering if her depictions of nature are beautiful and heartwarming, or destructive and faded. “Women often downplay the value of their work, despite the impact it has on themselves and on others,” Jacobson said. “Our creative work is important, especially during difficult social and political times.”

A native of Chicago, Karen Searle enjoys creating sculptures and relief images using knitted yarn. Her art in performing depicts her take on being a woman. One of her pieces, “Woman Within”, depicts a woman knitted inside another, representing aging. “Women artists find it difficult to gain visibility for their work,” Searle said. “Women’s art was never recognized or included in art history studies until the feminist art movement of the 1970s and 1980s. The situation has improved somewhat since then, but a percentage surprisingly low female art is still on display in major museums. This is one of the reasons why exhibitions like “Modern Woman” are so important. “

Dr Jenny Lau, originally from Alberta, Canada, explores life at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in her work on display in “Modern Woman” – when grocery stores were both sanctuaries and ghost towns. “I represent someone who is a minority: I am Asian and I am a woman,” Lau said. “I think it’s important for me to portray someone like that and to show that anyone can really express themselves in any art form and that people will appreciate it.”


To view this exhibition and learn more about the artists, click here.


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